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Federal Criminal Defense Attorneys Serving Las Vegas

Veteran Criminal Defense Lawyers Aggressively Represent Clients Facing Federal Accusations

Our experienced federal criminal defense attorneys aggressively represent clients throughout Clark County. If you are under investigation, have been served with a grand jury subpoena, or are currently facing federal charges, give Oberheiden, P.C. a call at 888-680-1745 to schedule your free and confidential consultation.

The federal government has broad authority to prosecute all types of criminal offenses under federal law. While many allegedly illegal actions implicate both state and federal court jurisdiction, as a matter of course, federal prosecutors allow their state counterparts to handle most of these cases. However, when a case presents especially high stakes or involves a matter of national import, the federal government may decide to bring the case in federal court. Generally, federal cases are much more serious than criminal cases in state courts and, even if you’ve never been arrested before, you could face significant penalties, including a decades-long jail sentence. If you recently learned that you are under investigation for a federal crime, contact a Las Vegas federal criminal defense attorney as soon as possible.

We also bring a unique perspective because many of our attorneys and local counsel formerly prosecuted federal crimes on behalf of the federal government. If you are under investigation by the FBI, DEA, IRS or OIG, you need an attorney who is ready to jump to your defense at a moment’s notice. You need the federal defense attorneys at Oberheiden, P.C. in your corner.

Why You Need a Respected Federal Criminal Defense Attorney

Facing federal criminal charges can be overwhelming, regardless of whether this is your first involvement with the criminal justice system or if you’ve been through the process before. Federal prosecutors with the U.S. Attorney’s Office are among the most experienced and skilled in the country and often have decades of experience handling complex and high-stakes cases. While there are many Las Vegas federal criminal defense attorneys who are equipped to competently handle your claim, when your future is on the line, mere competence is not enough. You need a lawyer who excels at their craft and can effectively guide you through every stage of the process. At Oberheiden, P.C., we have unrivaled experience and knowledge when it comes to federal crimes.

This is the experience that we offer our clients:

  • We have over 70 years of Department of Justice experience
  • We regularly secure dismissals federal indictments
  • We have a staff consisting of many former federal prosecutors
  • We have experience handling more than 1,000 federal cases
  • We have handled more than 1,000 grand jury subpoenas

The Types of Federal Criminal Cases Oberheiden, P.C. Handles

At Oberheiden, P.C., we represent clients facing all types of federal criminal charges in the District of Nevada, including, but not limited to the following:

  • Attempt offenses
  • Bank fraud
  • Bribery
  • Conspiracy charges
  • Drug manufacture and distribution
  • Embezzlement
  • Healthcare fraud
  • Identity theft
  • Insider trading
  • Insurance fraud
  • Intellectual property theft
  • Mail and wire fraud
  • Money laundering
  • Mortgage fraud
  • Public corruption
  • Securities fraud
  • Tax evasion
  • Theft of government property
  • Whistleblower claims
  • White collar crime

Regardless of the nature of the federal government’s allegations, the skilled federal criminal defense lawyers at Oberheiden, P.C. can help. We will immediately get to work investigating the government case and developing a custom-tailored and comprehensive defense strategy.

Las Vegas Federal Criminal Defense Attorney

What to Do When You Learn You Are Under Investigation for a Federal Offense

From the moment you realize the federal government is considering pursuing criminal charges against you, there are critical steps you must take to protect your interests. Unlike state court prosecutions, federal prosecutors fully investigate and prepare a case before filing formal charges. This means that by the time you learn you are under investigation, federal prosecutors have already made up their minds regarding your involvement. Not only that, but in many cases, prosecutors will have also presented their case to a grand jury, which found that there was probable cause to believe you committed the crimes in question.

Given this landscape, time is of the essence. Below is a list of a few things you need to keep in mind when you learn you are under investigation for a federal crime.

Do Not Speak to Federal Prosecutors of Investigators

In most federal criminal cases, federal agents will keep their investigations secret. Thus, you may not learn that you are being considered for federal charges until they’ve been formally filed. However, in some situations, federal investigators will approach a subject during the investigative stage. They usually do this when they do not have enough evidence to obtain a grand jury indictment. Thus, if federal investigators approach you asking about an open investigation, there is likely nothing you can say to them that will eliminate you as a suspect. In fact, in speaking to investigators, you only run the risk of providing them with the evidence they are looking for. And once you make a statement to investigators or voluntarily provide them with evidence, you’re stuck with the consequences. Rather than take your chances discussing a pending investigation with FBI agents, reach out to a dedicated federal criminal defense lawyer.

Respond Strategically to Any Grand Jury Subpoenas

When the federal government is investigating a possible crime, it uses grand jury subpoenas to obtain evidence. Grand jury subpoenas come in two forms. The first requires you to produce the evidence named in the subpoena for the government’s inspection. For example, a prosecutor may subpoena bank records, business records, internal company policies, and emails or other communications. Receiving a subpoena demanding the production of evidence puts you in a difficult spot. One on hand, you are legally required to comply with a valid grand jury subpoena, and your failure to do so can result in the court holding you in contempt. Further, an inadequate response to a grand jury subpoena may raise the suspicions of federal prosecutors. However, responding to a subpoena without carefully scrutinizing the breadth of the request can result in you providing the government with additional, potentially incriminating, evidence that could later be used against you.

The second type of grand jury subpoena requires you to appear to testify in front of the grand jury. If you are called to testify in front of a grand jury, you are not entitled to have an attorney present. This is the equivalent of walking into the room blindfolded. To protect your interests, you must consult with a Las Vegas federal criminal defense attorney beforehand, so you can know what to expect and how to effectively respond to the questions that the federal prosecutor will likely ask you.

Don’t Rush to the Negotiation Table

One of the most common mistakes that defendants in Las Vegas federal criminal cases make is to approach prosecutors expressing an interest in pleading guilty in exchange for a negotiated sentence. Certainly, in some cases, a negotiated guilty plea is a viable option; however, there is nothing to be gained by rushing to the negotiation table.

When you express interest in a guilty plea early on in a federal criminal case, you give all the bargaining power to the federal prosecutors. You are essentially telling them that you want to plead guilty to avoid a trial. The natural inference prosecutors will make is that you are, in fact, guilty. This leaves them with no incentive to critically examine their own case.

Instead, the better option is to discuss your case with an experienced Las Vegas federal criminal defense attorney. Your attorney can perform a full investigation, looking for any weaknesses in the government’s case. Perhaps they discover another potentially responsible party who played a larger role or uncover evidence that refutes the prosecution’s theory of the case. Remember, the burden in a federal criminal trial rests with the prosecution, and you are innocent until proven guilty. You cannot know what evidence federal prosecutors have, and you should not assume they have any more evidence than they’ve told you they have.

At Oberheiden, P.C., we recognize that facing federal charges is incredibly stressful and that you may not know what to expect throughout the process. We believe that certainty is one of the most important things we bring to the table. We’ve handled thousands of federal cases and have handled many trials, giving us a deep understanding of how prosecutors think and how these cases proceed through the system. When you bring Oberheiden, P.C. onto your team, we will sit down with you to discuss every option, every contingency plan, and we will leave no stone unturned.

Put our highly experienced team on your side

Dr. Nick Oberheiden
Dr. Nick Oberheiden

Founder

Attorney-at-Law

John W. Sellers
John W. Sellers

Former Senior Trial Attorney
U.S. Department of Justice

Local Counsel

Joanne Fine DeLena
Joanne Fine DeLena

Former Assistant U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Joe Brown
Joe Brown

Former U.S. Attorney & Former District Attorney

Local Trial & Defense Counsel

Amanda Marshall
Amanda Marshall

Former U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Aaron L. Wiley
Aaron L. Wiley

Former Federal Prosecutor

Local Counsel

Roger Bach
Roger Bach

Former Special Agent (OIG)

Michael Koslow
Michael Koslow

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

Chris Quick
Chris Quick

Former Special Agent (FBI & IRS-CI)

Kevin M. Sheridan
Kevin M. Sheridan

Former Special Agent (FBI)

Ray Yuen
Ray Yuen

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

Dennis A. Wichern
Dennis A. Wichern

Former Special Agent-in-Charge (DEA)

Why Choose Oberheiden, P.C. to Represent You in Your Federal Case?

The skilled federal criminal defense attorneys at Oberheiden, P.C. have earned a national reputation for providing aggressive, effective representation to those facing federal crimes. Our lawyers come from a variety of different professional backgrounds, giving us a diverse range of experience and knowledge that we put into every case we handle.

Perhaps the biggest difference between Oberheiden, P.C. and other local federal criminal defense law firms is that many of our attorneys have spent decades prosecuting these very cases on behalf of the government. This provides us with unique insight into how the government builds, views, and prosecutes these cases. If you face federal charges in the District of Nevada, don’t hesitate to contact one of our federal criminal defense attorneys to schedule a free consultation.

Consult with a Knowledgeable Federal Criminal Defense Lawyer Today

If you are facing the reality of taking on skilled federal prosecutors and the harsh federal sentencing guidelines, contact Oberheiden, P.C. immediately. We offer a free consultation, so we can meet to discuss your case, go over the details, and determine what we can do to help. Call Oberheiden, P.C., at 888-680-1745, or request a free case evaluation online now to discuss your options.

Frequently Asked Questions:

What is a Grand Jury?

 

A grand jury is a group of regular citizens who are asked to listen to a case presented by a federal prosecutor. The grand jury’s job is to determine if the federal government has enough evidence to bring federal criminal charges against the subject of their investigation. Unlike a traditional trial, grand jury proceedings are conducted in secret, meaning the subject often has no idea they are being investigated. Given this reality, the subject is not present and has no opportunity to present any evidence. If a grand jury finds that the federal government’s evidence establishes probable cause that you committed the listed offenses, it will return a true bill. Once the grand jury issues a true bill, it permits prosecutors to formally indict you. If you recently learned that you were indicted by a grand jury, it is imperative that you reach out to the dedicated federal criminal defense attorneys at Oberheiden, P.C. as soon as possible.

What should I do if the FBI shows up at my house?

 

If FBI agents show up at your home or business, the main thing to remember is that you absolutely should not speak with them about their investigation until after consulting with an experienced Las Vegas, Nevada federal criminal defense attorney. FBI agents are not obligated to be truthful with you when discussing the details of their investigation, and routinely tell suspects that they “just want to talk.” They do this in hopes of getting you to let your guard down, allow them into your home, or accidentally make an incriminating statement. Even if you were not a suspect, even a minor misstep can result in you putting yourself in the middle of a federal investigation.

What does it mean if I am a “target” of a federal criminal investigation?

 

When federal investigators are working on a case, they classify anyone who is potentially involved into one of three categories: witnesses, subjects, and targets. A witness is someone who the federal government believes has relevant information pertaining to an investigation but is not suspected of any wrongdoing. A subject is someone who the government believes is possibly involved with a crime. While federal agents lack the evidence necessary to obtain an indictment against a subject, they are constantly on the lookout for any evidence that may implicate a subject. A target is someone whom, after conducting an investigation, the government believes committed a federal crime. In other words, they are the target of the investigation. When federal prosecutors identify someone as a target, they send them a target letter informing them of their status. If you receive a target letter, it means that the government believes you violated a federal law and plans to indict you, and grand jury proceedings are likely already underway. If you are in receipt of a target letter, it is crucial that you reach out to a federal criminal defense attorney immediately to protect your interests.

What is white collar crime?

 

White collar crime refers to a broad range of financial crimes. Most white collar crimes involve allegations that someone made a false or misleading statement with the intention of inducing another person to take certain actions, usually that benefit the person charged with the crime. There are many examples of white collar crimes, including embezzlement, wire fraud, mortgage fraud, healthcare fraud, tax evasion, insurance fraud and bank fraud. While there is a widespread belief that the government does not take white collar crimes as seriously as other types of offenses, this is not the case. In most cases, a conviction for a white collar crime carries the possibility of prison time, significant fines, long-term probation, as well as professional sanctions. If you face allegations of white collar crime, you cannot afford to take any chances and should reach out to the federal criminal defense attorneys at Oberheiden, P.C. for immediate assistance.

What is the difference between state and federal criminal charges?

 

Although the difference between state and federal criminal charges can be complex, sometimes it boils down to the simple fact that violations of federal law are prosecuted in federal court and violations of state law are prosecuted in state court. Due to the overlap between state and federal crimes, however, federal prosecutors often have the ability to bring a case if they decide to do so. Although federal prosecutors permit state prosecutors to bring most cases in state court, they will pick up cases that involve very serious or noteworthy allegations. Federal prosecutors also handle cases that involve a crime that was allegedly committed in two or more states.

Which types of cases does the federal government bring?

 

The relationship between the state and federal government is complex. However, legally speaking, federal prosecutors could bring most criminal cases if they chose to do so. Essentially, a federal prosecutor can bring charges against you as long as a federal court has jurisdiction over the case. To establish jurisdiction, the allegations must either involve a federal statute or a crime that was committed across state lines. Most actions that violate a state law also violate federal laws, thus, federal prosecutors have broad discretion in the cases they take. However, in practice, federal prosecutors typically only bring the most serious cases. For example, while federal prosecutors would not likely bother bringing a case against someone arrested for distributing a few grams of drugs, they may pick up the case if the allegations involved several kilos that were transported across state lines.


Facing A Federal Investigation in Las Vegas? Clients Trust Oberheiden, P.C.

If you face charges in federal court, you deserve a federal criminal defense attorney who will take your case as seriously as you do and begin working on your case immediately. Please call 888-680-1745 or contact Oberheiden, P.C. today.

Additional Pages for Las Vegas, Nevada

Oberheiden P.C. does not have offices in the state of Nevada and is not a Nevada law firm. Its lawyers are not licensed to practice law in the state of Nevada. On a case by case basis, consistent with the terms of this website, we consider certain matters of federal law representations.

Lawyers of Oberheiden P.C. are not certified in any way as experts or specialists.

Why Clients Trust Oberheiden P.C.

  • 1,000+ Cases Handled
  • Available Nights & Weekends
  • Experienced Trial Attorneys
  • Former Department of Justice Trial Attorneys
  • Former Federal Prosecutors, U.S. Attorney’s Office
  • Former Agents from FBI, OIG, DEA
  • Cases Handled in 48 States
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