Dallas Grand Jury Subpoenas Attorneys - Oberheiden, P.C.
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Dallas, TX Grand Jury Subpoenas Lawyers

Oberheiden, P.C. is a healthcare law defense firm with expertise in the areas of regulatory compliance, corporate structuring, litigation, government investigations, and criminal defense. Many of our attorneys are graduates of some of the country’s finest colleges such as Harvard Law School and Yale Law School.

Dallas address – by appointment only:
4131 N Central Expy, #900
Dallas, TX 75204
972-846-8818

Oberheiden, P.C. has extensive experience representing clients in federal grand jury proceedings. All our clients are represented by experienced senior attorneys.

Dallas, Texas Grand Jury Investigations

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Dallas, Texas has seen a significant increase in federal inquiries and grand jury actions. Oberheiden, P.C. represents individuals and corporations facing grand jury proceedings. Our experienced defense counsel can assist with subpoena requests served during an investigation. The federal government inspects for healthcare, securities, mortgage, bank, and tax fraud as well as fraud related to government programs and procurement.

If you or your organization has received a grand jury subpoena, call Oberheiden, P.C. now to set up a free and confidential consultation. We’ve handled hundreds of grand jury subpoenas. We know how to minimize our clients’ criminal charges.

Put our highly experienced team on your side

Dr. Nick Oberheiden
Dr. Nick Oberheiden

Founder

Attorney-at-Law

Lynette S. Byrd
Lynette S. Byrd

Former Department of Justice

Brian J. Kuester
Brian J. Kuester

Former U.S. Attorney
Former DA

John W. Sellers
John W. Sellers

Former Senior Trial Attorney
U.S. Department of Justice

Local Counsel

Joanne Fine DeLena
Joanne Fine DeLena

Former Assistant U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Joe Brown
Joe Brown

Former U.S. Attorney & Former District Attorney

Local Trial & Defense Counsel

Amanda Marshall
Amanda Marshall

Former U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Aaron L. Wiley
Aaron L. Wiley

Former Federal Prosecutor

Local Counsel

Roger Bach
Roger Bach

Former Special Agent (OIG)

Michael Koslow
Michael Koslow

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

Chris Quick
Chris Quick

Former Special Agent (FBI & IRS-CI)

Ray Yuen
Ray Yuen

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

Explaining the Grand Jury Process

A grand jury indictment charges federal felonies as required by the U.S. Constitution. The grand jury has the authority to determine if probable cause for an indictment exists. They determine this by issuing subpoenas as a part of their process. There are two types of federal grand jury subpoenas.

  • Testimony. This type of subpoena requires an individual to appear before the grand jury. During the appearance, a sworn testimony in provided. Counsel cannot be present in grand jury proceedings, so there is a risk of self-incrimination. We prefer to negotiate and help our clients avoid testimony.
  • Documents. This subpoena requires an individual or company to release specific documents and records by a deadline. It is referred to as subpoena duces tecum. Corporate records, contracts, financial information, e-mail, or texts must be given to the government. Included are photos, videos, and any other items determined important. The subpoena is only enforceable if the materials requested are relevant, accurately described, and have a reasonable deadline.

After receipt of the information, the grand jury can decide if there is probable cause that a crime exists. The grand jury will either approve the indictment or issue a “No Bill”. “No Bill” means there is insufficient evidence for charging the individual with a crime. The government will send an official notification in cases of indictment charges. Many targets are unaware that an investigation is ongoing because grand juries convene in private. Do not confuse an indictment with a conviction or guilt. A grand jury only determines if there is probable cause that a crime exists in order to proceed. Guilt and conviction are an entirely different matter.

Facing a Grand Jury Subpoena? Here’s What You Need to Know

The purpose of the grand jury is to determine if information warrants indictment for a crime. Their function in the process should encourage parties to create proper defense plans. With effective defense work, potential targets may be asked to serve simply as witnesses.

  • Do not underestimate the power of a grand jury subpoena. Subpoenas are fully enforceable by law and should not be ignored. An attorney can make proper objections to the subpoena on your behalf. In Dallas, grand jury subjects should consult with an experienced lawyer for a timely and proper response to a subpoena.
  • Don’t talk to federal agents. If federal agents contact you or your business, do not speak with them or agree to an interview. There is nothing to gain from speaking with an agent, despite what they may tell you. It is important to have your lawyer present. Federal law prohibits you from misrepresenting or lying to a federal agent. You can provide your name and identification to them. However, you should insist that any discussions occur with your attorney present.
  • Do not delete, alter, or destroy requested records. Do not destroy, alter, or tamper with any documents, records, communications, pictures, videos, or any other records you have been asked to provide by subpoena. Obstruction of justice is a federal felony.
  • Do not volunteer to provide information. A subpoena does not mean that every document or record in your possession must be handed over. Do not overly cooperate or share information not requested. A subpoena asks for very specific types of information to be submitted. Consult with an attorney. A lawyer can help you select and organize files to submit with an appropriate response.

Organizing Grand Jury Subpoena Responses

Providing false or implicating information during a federal investigation will create more problems. To reduce risks, you need to rely on an attorney to assist through the process. An experienced defense attorney can intervene once a grand jury subpoena is received. He or she can help confine and redefine the case’s scope.

  • Organize. Plan your defense in advance if you suspect a grand jury subpoena may be issued. Ensure that all records are in order, organized, and accurate. If they are not, take time to get organized. A healthcare practice must ensure that they are in full compliance with policies and that all training is up to date. Make sure to have your attorney review and approve employment contracts and 1099 forms. Have your financials reviewed and tax filings approved by your accountant.
  • Preserve. Criminal prosecution can be a separate matter if records are hidden, altered, tampered with, or destroyed. Promptly put in place a document preservation notice. This serves to notify staff and owners to preserve all documents and communications. Everything pertinent to the subpoena should be handled with care. A voluntary preservation effort can have a positive impact on the resolution of your case.
  • Produce. Contact your attorney as soon as you receive a subpoena. Your attorney will contact the prosecutor in charge to discuss details of the subpoena. He or she may request an extension, and expedite any requests made. While your attorney communicates with the government, you should begin collecting all requested materials. It can take several weeks to gather the information needed. Your attorney will review materials to determine what information you must submit.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a grand jury?

 

The federal government convenes a grand jury in every felony federal criminal case. The federal government cannot charge a felony before obtaining a grand jury’s approval. However, grand jury proceedings are criticized because the subject of the investigation is not present. Any evidence showing innocence can not be presented to the jury. Therefore, grand juries can find probable cause, even when a subject is innocent. However, this does not mean that an indictment for a federal crime is not serious. In fact, the opposite is true. Prosecutors believe that you are guilty by the time they issue an indictment. Are you under investigation or recently indicted for a federal crime? Do not hesitate to get in touch with our firm to discuss your options and best defense strategy.

What should I do if I’m indicted?

 

If indicted, finding a highly skilled Dallas federal criminal defense attorney should be your main focus. Ideally, you would have obtained a lawyer before the charges were filed, however, it is not too late. When you learn of the indictment, federal prosecutors have already conducted a thorough inquiry. And, they have established probable cause you committed the crime through presenting their case to a grand jury. Even though the prosecution has a head start, it does not mean you will be found guilty. You must act quickly to retain a Texas federal criminal defense attorney.

What can a Dallas federal criminal defense attorney do to help me?

 

An accredited Dallas, TX federal criminal defense attorney can play an important role. No matter what stage of the process your case is in. If you are under investigation, an attorney can offer guidance in engaging with prosecutors. The aim being to shift focus of the case away from you. Your attorney may be able to work with federal prosecutors to avoid filing charges. If you’ve been indicted, an experienced attorney is crucial in developing strategies for your defense.


Oberheiden, P.C.

Dallas, TX Grand Jury Subpoenas LawyersOberheiden, P.C. represents individual and corporate clients in federal grand jury proceedings. Our goal is avoiding criminal charges. Our attorneys assist clients in federal criminal cases, government investigations, and grand jury actions across the United States. The following represent case outcomes.

  • Grand Jury Subpoena against Physician
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • Grand Jury Subpoena against Physician
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • Grand Jury Subpoena against Pharmacy
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • Grand Jury Subpoena against Business Owner
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • Grand Jury Subpoena against Accountant
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • OIG Subpoena against Business
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • OIG Subpoena against Business
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • OIG Subpoena against Business
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • OIG Subpoena against Business
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • OIG Subpoena against Business
    Result: No criminal charges.
  • OIG Subpoena against Business
    Result: No criminal charges.
 

If you received a government subpoena, contact us today. Speak to the experienced attorneys of Oberheiden, P.C. and request a free and confidential consultation to assess your case.

Additional Pages for Dallas, Texas

Oberheiden P.C.
4131 N Central Expy, #900
Dallas, TX 75205
972-846-8818

This information has been prepared for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. This information may constitute attorney advertising in some jurisdictions. Reading of this information does not create an attorney-client relationship. Prior results do not guarantee similar future outcomes. Oberheiden, P.C. is a Texas PC with headquarters in Dallas. Dr. Oberheiden limits his practice to federal law.

Why Clients Trust Oberheiden P.C.

  • 2,000+ Cases Won
  • Available Nights & Weekends
  • Experienced Trial Attorneys
  • Former Department of Justice Trial Attorney
  • Former Federal Prosecutors, U.S. Attorney’s Office
  • Former Agents from FBI, OIG, DEA
  • Serving Clients Nationwide
Email Us 888-680-1745