Quick Practice Area Locator

What Should I Do If I Am Under Federal Investigation?

Man Arrested By Police After Commiting A Crime Of Theft.

FBI, DEA, IRS, ICE, Homeland Security, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Office of Inspector General (OIG), the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, the Department of Defense (DOD), and other federal agencies are tasked to investigate civil and criminal violations of federal law. All these law enforcement branches have in common that they ultimately report to prosecutors at the U.S. Justice Department. There, federal prosecutors will make the decision whether or not to open a formal investigation or to even bring federal felony charges.

The former Justice Department officials and former federal prosecutors at Oberheiden P.C. know from decades on the frontline that federal investigations are extremely stressful—and can take years. Because a uniform database to look up who is under investigation does not exist in federal cases, the only way for you to find out if you are in fact under investigation is through experienced federal lawyers. The earlier you call the experienced attorneys at Oberheiden P.C., the more likely it will be that you avoid some of the common mistakes people make in federal cases.

Step 1: Are You Really Under Investigation?

The thought of being investigated is scary—and can sometimes lead to paranoia. If you believe you are under investigation, call a federal lawyer. Don’t overreact, don’t interpret, don’t assume. Keep the following in mind.

The FBI typically does not intercept phone conversations. Unless your case is one of international terrorism, national security, organized crime, or a crime involving minors, it is very difficult for the government to convince a federal judge to grant even limited and only temporary permission to wiretap your phone. Nonetheless, if you believe or have reasons to believe that you are under investigation, you should always speak, text, and communicate as if the FBI and your mother are listening in. No inappropriate pictures, racial comments, and no discussion about the potential investigation!

The FBI typically does not follow you around. Once you assure yourself that you are under investigation—even if you are objectively not! —you might feel that you are noticing people to follow you. Well, outside of extremely rare circumstances, the FBI (IRS, DEA, OIG) does not go shopping with you, will not follow you to the supermarket, and will not have dinner at a restaurant table next to yours. That’s simply not how the government investigates. What investigative promise could possibly derive from spending hours or days observing your routine habits? Unless the government thinks that following you will lead them to a co-conspirator, reveal a new target, or will catch you in the middle of an illegal transaction—the government will not conduct this level of surveillance. There simply aren’t enough resources. This also means that the black car you might suddenly see across the street is very likely not an FBI surveillance car. Put differently, if the FBI actually follows you around, they will do it in such a professional and discrete manner that you will not notice—otherwise it would defeat any and all purpose!

Step 2: Are You Really Under Investigation?

There are a number of (objective) ways to determine whether you are indeed part of an investigation. You may think you are under investigation because you have heard from acquaintances, friends, former business partners that the FBI is interviewing people mentioning your name. Here are the most common scenarios.

  • The FBI Wants to Interview You
  • You Receive a Grand Jury Subpoena
  • Federal Agents Raid Your House/Office
  • You Receive a Target Letter
  • You Get Arrested

Each of these events describes a verifiable indication that you are somehow involved in a federal investigation. The question then becomes: how am I involved? Federal lawyers typically distinguish three levels of involvement: witness, subject, target.

As a witness, the government believes that you have information (e.g. emails, documents, any form of knowledge) about a case. As a target, the government believes that you committed a crime or helped someone else commit a crime as a co-conspirator. In such a case, you may receive a target letter, experience a raid, or ultimately you could get arrested. As a subject, the government is not sure whether you are a mere witness or a target.

In either way, the only way you will find out what the investigation is about and what your alleged involvement is is through your attorney. You can’t just call the FBI agent that left a card at your door and ask because the agent is not allowed to disclose the nature of a federal investigation. Your attorney, however, will find out from the agent and from the supervising government prosecutor, the Assistant United States Attorney. The earlier an experienced federal lawyer will make these inquiries for you, the more likely it is that you will influence whether you will end up as a target or a non-target. The longer you wait, the more time you give the government to investigate you, the less time your attorney will have to turn things around. If you want early answers to your most pressing questions and if you want to dramatically increase your chances of escaping the investigation unharmed and without appearing in the newspaper one day, then call the experienced former DOJ prosecutors and federal defense attorneys of Oberheiden P.C. immediately.

Step 3: Don’t Talk to Law Enforcement

People have all kinds of thoughts once they realize that they are indeed under investigation. Human nature dictates that you will likely feel a need to protect yourself. In the context of an investigation this often leads to a fatal panic reaction.

The mistake is to tell yourself that you can handle things on your own. Because you did not do anything wrong, so why should you need anyone’s help? This misconception often leads to you saying “yes” when federal agents come to your house (or your business) and ask you if you have a few minutes to answer a few questions. The agents will assure you that you are not in trouble and make use of the fact that they find you completely overwhelmed, uninformed, and unprepared. After all, you have never dealt with the FBI before and the mere fact that federal agents come to you puts you in such a state of shock that you trust their reassurance that the investigation is not about you.

Think about this. Why in the world would the FBI come to you if the investigation did not involve you in some way?  So, note, that the FBI is absolutely allowed to lie to you—and they will blindside you, they will lie to you, and they will tell you anything they consider promising for you to be chatty and volunteer information before you can think clearly and before you can hire a lawyer. Vise-versa, what you don’t know (yet) is that your natural reaction to be defensive, to not share any information that could make you look bad or even guilty, or to (slightly) minimize or misrepresent your knowledge or involvement in the matter they are investigating, can get you exactly into the trouble the agents promised you does not exist.

Here is why: Under federal law, withholding or misrepresenting mischaracterizing information (let alone: lying) in the presence of a federal agent constitutes a federal felony. Yes, that’s correct: (innocently) talking to an FBI agent is the equivalent to testifying in federal court under oath. Of course, the agents won’t tell you that—because who would then still volunteer for their interview? No one! Every single day people screw up their entire case because they can’t resist the temptation to “defend” themselves when FBI agents want to interview them. Don’t be one of them. Call Oberheiden PC attorneys first, let them find out for you what the investigation is really about—and what your role in the case is. Don’t ever talk to federal law enforcement.

Step 4: Don’t Destroy Evidence

The FBI just left your house. You are scared to death. You realize you are in trouble. What do you do? You start burning papers, deleting emails, and bulldozing your old phone. You call your buddy; your encrypted message tells him that you both need to meet asap but you can’t tell him why. Just meet me at the gas station. At the gas station, you tell your friend that the feds just showed up. You need to get this horrible visit of your chest. Your friend needs to know too because they may visit him next. You want to coordinate your stories. You come up with a joint version. The feds will be “impressed” because your friend will confirm exactly what you just told them. Out of an abundance of caution, you may also recommend for your friend to throw his phone in the nearest river and to quickly delete information from his laptop.

You just committed a serious crime. Obstruction of justice is a serious federal felony. Don’t delete files, don’t destroy evidence, don’t tell a potential accomplice about an investigation, don’t instruct someone how to testify, and don’t do anything else that could be interpreted as you are impeding or tampering with a federal investigation. You will never prevail with this approach. In fact, obstruction charges are what federal law enforcement calls a low hanging fruit. In times of computer forensics, advanced science, and highly trained special agents, chances you will get away with deleting evidence are below a measurable scale. Don’t ever do it.

If the prospect of years of imprisonment does not deter you, consider this: federal agents are far from stupid. As the investigation progresses and the pressure increases and ultimately becomes unbearable, someone with knowledge of tampering or obstructing will tell the government—to obtain immunity for himself for disclosing. This someone could be your best buddy, your long-time partner, or even your spouse. Facing an additional five years in federal prison has that type of effect on people!

Step 1-4: Consult with an Experienced Federal Defense Attorney ASAP

More than a 1,000 federal criminal investigations as former federal prosecutors in charge of FBI, DEA, OIG, IRS, and Homeland investigations has taught us that criminal charges are often avoidable. The earlier competent counsel intervenes into the case, the disproportionately more likely it is that you will not end up in the newspaper. That said, Oberheiden P.C. attorneys have avoided criminal charges in literally hundreds of cases and saved many good people like you from criminal exposure. Here are some of the investigation types we have resolved for our clients:

  • Federal Conspiracy Charges
  • Medicare Fraud, Medicaid Fraud
  • Illegal Kickbacks
  • Healthcare Fraud (18 U.S.C. 1347)
  • Federal Drug Conspiracy (21 U.S.C. 846)
  • Bribery (18 U.S.C. 201)
  • Mail Fraud (18 U.S.C. 1341)
  • Wire Fraud 18 U.S.C. 1343)
  • Computer Crimes
  • Tax Fraud (26 U.S.C. 7206)
  • Embezzlement
  • Bank Fraud (18 U.S.C. 1344)
  • Counterfeiting (18 U.S.C. 2320)
  • Money Laundering (18 U.S.C. 1956)
  • Mortgage Fraud
  • Insurance Fraud
  • Securities Fraud (15 U.S.C. 78j, 78jj; 18 U.S.C. 1348)
  • Obstruction of Justice (18 U.S.C. 1512)
  • Perjury/ False Statement (18 U.S.C. 1001)
  • Intellectual Property Crimes
  • Credit Card Fraud
  • Identity Theft
  • Pornography Offenses
  • Prostitution & Trafficking Offenses
  • Unauthorized Access (18 U.S.C. 1030)
  • Espionage Act
  • Patriot Act
  • Wiretapping
  • Obstruction of Justice
  • RICO Allegations

Our Trusted and Experienced Attorneys Have Protected Clients in More Than 40 U.S. States. Call the Experienced Federal Lawyers of Oberheiden P.C.

Arkansas is divided into different federal districts. The Natural State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (in case citations, 8th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Arkansas, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Arkansas is divided into two federal districts, the Eastern District and the Western District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas (E.D. Ark) covers the counties of Cross, Lee, Monroe, Phillips, Saint Francis, Woodruff, Clay, Craighead, Crittenden, Greene, Lawrence, Mississippi, Poinsett, Randolph, Cleburne, Fulton, Independence, Izard, Jackson, Sharp, Arkansas, Chicot, Cleveland, Dallas, Desha, Drew, Grant, Jefferson, Lincoln, Stone, Conway, Faulkner, Lonoke, Perry, Pope, Prairie, Pulaski, Saline, Van Buren, White, and Yell and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Little Rock (500 West Capitol Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72201), Helena (617 Walnut, Helena, AR 72342), and Jonesboro (615 South Main Street, Room 312, Jonesboro, AR 72401).

The United States District Court for the Western District of Arkansas (W.D. Ark) covers the counties of Ashley, Bradley, Calhoun, Columbia, Ouachita, Union, Benton, Madison, Washington, Crawford, Franklin, Johnson, Logan, Polk, Scott, Sebastian, Baxter, Boone, Carroll, Marion, Newton, Searcy, Clark, Garland, Hot Spring, Montgomery, Pike, Hempstead, Howard, Lafayette, Little River, Miller, Nevada, and Sevier and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in El Dorado (101 South Jackson Avenue, Room 205, El Dorado, Arkansas, 71730-6133), Fayetteville (35 East Mountain Street, Room 510, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701-5354), Fort Smith (30 South 6th Street, Room 1038, Fort Smith, Arkansas, 72901-2437), Harrison (402 North Walnut Street, Harrison, Arkansas,72601-3630), Hot Springs (100 Reserve Street, Room 347, Hot Springs, Arkansas, 71901-4143), and Texarkana (500 North State Line Avenue, Room 302, Texarkana, Arkansas, 71854-5961).

Illinois is divided into different federal districts. The Land of Lincoln is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (in case citations, 7th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Illinois, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Illinois is divided into three federal districts, the Northern District, the Central District, and the Southern District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois (N.D. Ill) covers the counties of Cook, DuPage, Grundy, Kane, Kendall, La Salle, Lake, Will, Boone, Carroll, De Kalb, Jo Daviess, Lee, McHenry, Ogle, Stephenson, Whiteside, and Winnebago and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Chicago (219 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60604), and Rockford (327 South Church Street, Rockford, IL 61101).
  2. The United States District Court for the Central District of Illinois (C.D. Ill) covers the counties of Adams, Brown, Bureau, Cass, Champaign, Christian, Coles, DeWitt, Douglas, Edgar, Ford, Fulton, Greene, Hancock, Henderson, Henry, Iroquois, Kankakee, Knox, Livingston, Logan, McDonough, McLean, Macoupin, Macon, Marshall, Mason, Menard, Mercer, Montgomery, Morgan, Moultrie, Peoria, Piatt, Pike, Putnam, Rock Island, Sangamon, Schuyler, Scott, Shelby, Stark, Tazewell, Vermilion, Warren, and Woodford, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Peoria (309 U.S. Courthouse, 100 N.E. Monroe Street, Peoria, IL 61602), Urbana (218 U.S. Courthouse, 201 S. Vine Street, Urbana, IL 61802), Springfield (151 U.S. Courthouse, 600 E. Monroe Street, Springfield, IL 62701) and Rock Island (203 U.S. Courthouse, 211 19th Street, Rock Island, IL 61201).
  3. The United States District Court for the Southern District of Illinois (S.D. Ill) covers the counties of Alexander, Bond, Calhoun, Clark, Clay, Clinton, Crawford, Cumberland, Edwards, Effingham, Fayette, Franklin, Gallatin, Hamilton, Hardin, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, Jersey, Johnson, Lawrence, Madison, Marion, Massac, Monroe, Perry, Pope, Pulaski, Randolph, Richland, Saline, St. Clair, Union, Wabash, Washington, Wayne, White, and Williamson, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Benton (301 West Main Street, Benton, IL 62812), and East St. Louis (750 Missouri Avenue, East St. Louis, IL 62201).

Wisconsin is divided into different federal districts. The Badger State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (in case citations, 7th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Wisconsin, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Wisconsin is divided into two federal districts, the Eastern District and the Western District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin (E.D. Wis) covers the counties of Brown, Calumet, Door, Florence, Forest, Kewaunee, Langlade, Manitowoc, Marinette, Menominee, Oconto, Outagamie, Shawano, Waupaca, Waushara, and Winnebago, Dodge, Fond du Lac, Green Lake, Kenosha, Marquette, Milwaukee, Ozaukee, Racine, Sheboygan, Walworth, Washington, and Waukesha, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Milwaukee (517 E. Wisconsin Ave. Rm. 362, Milwaukee, WI 53202), and Green Bay (125 S. Jefferson St., Rm. 102, Green Bay, WI 54301-4541).
  2. The United States District Court for the Western District of Wisconsin (W.D. Wis) covers the counties of Adams, Ashland, Barron, Bayfield, Buffalo, Burnett, Chippewa, Clark, Columbia, Crawford, Dane, Douglas, Dunn, Eau Claire, Grant, Green, Iowa, Iron, Jackson, Jefferson, Juneau, La Crosse, Lafayette, Lincoln, Marathon, Monroe, Oneida, Pepin, Pierce, Polk, Portage, Price, Richland, Rock, Rusk, Sauk, St. Croix, Sawyer, Taylor, Trempealeau, Vernon, Vilas, Washburn and Wood, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Madison (120 N. Henry St., Rm. 320, Madison, WI 53703).

Tennessee is divided into different federal districts. The Volunteer State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit (in case citations, 6th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Tennessee, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Tennessee is divided into three federal districts, the Western District, the Eastern District, and the Middle District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Tennessee (E.D. Tenn.) covers the counties of Bledsoe, Bradley, Hamilton, Marion, McMinn, Meigs, Polk, Rhea, Sequatchie, Carter, Cocke, Greene, Hamblen, Hancock, Hawkins, Johnson, Sullivan, Unicoi, Washington, Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Claiborne, Grainger, Jefferson, Knox, Loudon, Monroe, Morgan, Roane, Scott, Sevier and Union, Bedford, Coffee, Franklin, Grundy, Lincoln, Moore, Warren and Van Buren and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Chattanooga (900 Georgia Avenue, Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402), Greeneville (220 West Depot Street, Suite 200, Greeneville, Tennessee 37743), Knoxville (800 Market Street, Suite 130, Knoxville, Tennessee 37902), and Winchester (200 South Jefferson Street, Winchester, Tennessee 37398).
  2. The United States District Court for the Western District of Tennessee (W.D. Tenn.) covers the counties of Benton, Carroll, Chester, Crockett, Decatur, Dyer, Fayette, Gibson, Hardeman, Hardin, Haywood, Henderson, Henry, Lake, Lauderdale, Madison, McNairy, Obion, Perry, Shelby, Tipton, and Weakley, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Memphis (167 N. Main Street, Room 242, Memphis, TN 38103), and Jackson (111 South Highland Avenue, Room 262, Jackson, TN 38301).
  3. The United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee (M.D. Tenn.) covers the counties of Giles, Hickman, Lawrence, Lewis, Marshall, Maury, Wayne, Clay, Cumberland, DeKalb, Fentress, Jackson, Macon, Overton, Pickett, Putnam, Smith, and White, Cannon, Cheatham, Davidson, Dickson, Houston, Humphreys, Montgomery, Robertson, Rutherford, Stewart, Sumner, Trousdale, Williamson, and Wilson, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Nashville (801 Broadway, Room 800, Nashville, TN 37203), and Columbia (815 South Garden Street, Columbia, TN 38401).

Michigan is divided into different federal districts. The Wolverine State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit (in case citations, 6th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Michigan, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Michigan is divided into two federal districts, the Eastern District and the Western District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan covers the counties of Alcona, Alpena, Arenac, Bay, Cheboygan, Clare, Crawford, Gladwin, Gratiot, Huron, Iosco, Isabella, Midland, Montmorency, Ogemaw, Oscoda, Otsego, Presque Isle, Roscommon, Saginaw, Tuscola, Genesee, Jackson, Lapeer, Lenawee, Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, Saint Clair, Sanilac, Shiawassee, Washtenaw, and Wayne, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Detroit (231 W. Lafayette Blvd., Detroit, MI 48226), Ann Arbor (200 E. Liberty Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48104), Bay City (1000 Washington Ave., Bay City, MI 48708), Flint (600 Church Street, Flint, MI 48502), and Port Huron (526 Water Street, Port Huron, MI 48060).
  2. The United States District Court for the Western District of Michigan covers the counties of Alger, Baraga, Chippewa, Delta, Dickinson, Gogebic, Houghton, Iron, Keweenaw, Luce, Mackinac, Marquette, Menominee, Ontonagon, Schoolcraft, Allegan, Antrim, Barry, Benzie, Berrien, Branch, Calhoun, Cass, Charlevoix, Clinton, Eaton, Emmet, Grand Traverse, Hillsdale, Ingham, Ionia, Kalamazoo, Kalkaska, Kent, Lake, Leelanau, Manistee, Mason, Mecosta, Missaukee, Montcalm, Muskegon, Newaygo, Oceana, Osceola, Ottawa, Saint Joseph, Van Buren, and Wexford, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Grand Rapids (110 Michigan St NW, Grand Rapids MI 49503), Lansing (113 Federal Bldg, 315 W Allegan St, Lansing MI 48933), Kalamazoo (107 Federal Bldg, 410 W Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo MI 49007), and Marquette (202 W Washington St, PO Box 698, Marquette MI 49855).

New York is divided into different federal districts. The Empire State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (in case citations, 2nd Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of New York, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. New York is divided into four federal districts, the Northern District, the Southern District, the Western District, and the Eastern District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Northern District of New York (N.D.N.Y.) covers the counties of Albany, Broome, Cayuga, Chenango, Clinton, Columbia, Cortland, Delaware, Essex, Franklin, Fulton, Greene, Hamilton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Otsego, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Schoharie, St. Lawrence, Tioga, Tompkins, Ulster, Warren, and Washington and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Albany (445 Broadway, Albany, NY 12207), Plattsburgh (14 Durkee St., Plattsburgh, NY 12901), Binghamton (15 Henry St., Binghamton, NY 13901), Syracuse (100 S. Clinton St., Syracuse, NY 13261), and Utica (10 Broad St., Utica, NY 13501).
  2. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York (E.D.N.Y.) covers the counties of Kings (Brooklyn), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island), Nassau, and Suffolk, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Brooklyn (225 Cadman Plaza East, Brooklyn, NY 11201), and Central Islip (100 Federal Plaza, Central Islip, NY 11722).
  3. The United States District Court for the Western District of New York (W.D.N.Y.) covers the counties of Allegany, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Chemung, Erie, Genesee, Livingston, Monroe, Niagara, Ontario, Orleans, Schuyler, Seneca, Steuben, Wayne, Wyoming, and Yates, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Buffalo (2 Niagara Square, Buffalo, NY 14202), and Rochester (100 State Street, Rochester, NY 14614).
  4. The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (S.D.N.Y.) covers the counties of New York (Manhattan), Bronx, Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Orange, Dutchess, and Sullivan, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in New York City (500 Pearl Street, New York, New York 10007), and White Plains (300 Quarrapos Street, White Plains, New York 10601).

Washington D.C. is divided into different federal districts. Our nation’s capital is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (in case citations, D.C. Cir.) known informally as the D.C. Circuit. In the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Washington D.C. contains one federal district and locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. District of Columbia Circuit (in case citations, D.C. Cir.) covers the entire District of Columbia (including Washington) and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Washington, D.C. (333 Constitution Ave., NW Washington, DC 20001).

Oklahoma is divided into different federal districts. The Sooner State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (in case citations, 10th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Oklahoma, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Oklahoma is divided into three federal districts, the Northern District, the Eastern District, and the Western District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma (N.D. Okla.) covers the counties of Craig, Creek, Delaware, Mayes, Nowata, Osage, Ottawa, Pawnee, Rogers, Tulsa, and Washington and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Tulsa (333 W. 4th Street, Room 411, Tulsa, OK 74103).
  2. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma (E.D. Okla.) covers the counties of Adair, Atoka, Bryan, Carter, Cherokee, Choctaw, Coal, Haskell, Hughes, Johnston, Latimer, Le Flore, Love, Marshall, McCurtain, McIntosh, Murray, Muskogee, Okfuskee, Okmulgee, Pittsburg, Pontotoc, Pushmataha, Seminole, Sequoyah, and Wagoner, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Muskogee (101 North 5th Street, Room 208, Muskogee, OK 74401).
  3. The United States District Court for the Western District of Oklahoma (W.D. Okla.) covers the counties of Alfalfa, Garfield, Grant, Kay, Noble, Payne, Beckham, Caddo, Comanche, Cotton, Greer, Harmon, Jackson, Jefferson, Kiowa, Stephens, Tillman, Washita, Blaine, Canadian, Cleveland, Garvin, Grady, Kingfisher, Lincoln, Logan, McClain, Oklahoma, Pottawatomie, Beaver, Cimarron, Custer, Dewey, Ellis, Harper, Major, Roger Mills, Texas, Woods, and Woodward, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Oklahoma City (200 NW 4th Street, Oklahoma City, OK 73102).

Nebraska is divided into different federal districts. The Cornhusker State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (in case citations, 8th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Nebraska, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Nebraska contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Nebraska (in case citations, D. Neb.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the District of Nebraska (in case citations, D. Neb.) covers the counties of Adams, Antelope, Arthur, Banner, Blaine, Boone, Box Butte, Boyd, Brown, Buffalo, Burt, Deuel, Dixon, Dodge, Douglas, Dundy, Fillmore, Franklin, Frontier, Furnas, Gage, Garden, Jefferson, Johnson, Kearney, Keith, Keya Paha, Kimball, Knox, Lancaster, Lincoln, Logan, Loup, Platte, Polk, Red Willow, Richardson, Rock, Saline, Sarpy, Saunders, Scotts Bluff, Seward, Sheridan, Sherman, Sioux, Stanton, Thayer, Thomas, Thurston, Valley, Washington, Wayne, Webster, Wheeler, and York and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Omaha (111 South 18th Plaza, Suite 1152, Omaha, NE 68102), Lincoln (100 Centennial Mall North, Room 593, Lincoln, NE  68508), and North Platte (301 North Jeffers St., North Platte, NE 69101).

Missouri is divided into different federal districts. The Show Me State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (in case citations, 8th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Missouri, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Missouri is divided into two federal districts, the Eastern District and the Western District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri covers the counties of Crawford, Dent, Franklin, Gasconade, Jefferson, Lincoln, Maries, Phelps, Saint Charles, Saint Francois, Saint Louis, Warren, Washington, the independent City of St. Louis, Adair, Audrain, Chariton, Clark, Knox, Lewis, Linn, Macon, Marion, Monroe, Montgomery, Pike, Ralls, Randolph, Schuyler, Shelby, Scotland, Bollinger, Butler, Cape Girardeau, Carter, Dunklin, Iron, Madison, Mississippi, New Madrid, Pemiscot, Perry, Reynolds, Ripley, Sainte Genevieve, Scott, Shannon, Stoddard, and Wayne and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Louis (111 South 10th Street, St. Louis, MO 63102), Cape Girardeau (555 Independence Street, Cape Girardeau, MO 63703), and Hannibal (801 Broadway, Hannibal, MO 63401).
  2. The United States District Court for the Western District of Missouri covers the counties of Bates, Carroll, Cass, Clay, Henry, Jackson, Johnson, Lafayette, Ray, St. Clair, Saline, Benton, Boone, Callaway, Camden, Cole, Cooper, Hickory, Howard, Miller, Moniteau, Morgan, Osage, Pettis, Cedar, Christian, Dade, Dallas, Douglas, Greene, Howell, Laclede, Oregon, Ozark, Polk, Pulaski, Taney, Texas, Webster, Wright, Andrew, Atchison, Buchanan, Caldwell, Clinton, Daviess, DeKalb, Gentry, Grundy, Harrison, Holt, Livingston, Mercer, Nodaway, Platte, Putnam, Sullivan, Worth, Barry, Barton, Jasper, Lawrence, McDonald, Newton, Stone, and Vernon and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Kansas City (400 E. 9th Street, Kansas City, MO 64106), Jefferson City (80 Lafayette Street, Jefferson City, MO 65101), and Springfield (222 N. John Q. Hammons Parkway, Springfield, MO 65806).

Minnesota is divided into different federal districts. The “Land of 10,000 Lakes,” is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (in case citations, 8th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Minnesota contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Minnesota (in case citations, D. Minn.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Utah (in case citations, D. Minn.) covers the counties of Dodge, Fillmore, Houston, Mower, Olmsted, Steele, Wabasha, Winona, Blue Earth, Brown, Cottonwood, Faribault, Freeborn, Jackson, Lac qui Parle, Le Sueur, Lincoln, Lyon, Martin, Murray, Nicollet, Nobles, Pipestone, Redwood, Rock, Sibley, Waseca, Watonwan, Yellow Medicine, Chisago, Dakota, Goodhue, Ramsey, Rice, Scott, Washington, Anoka, Carver, Chippewa, Hennepin, Isanti, Kandiyohi, McLeod, Meeker, Renville, Sherburne, Swift, Wright, Aitkin, Benton, Carlton, Cass, Cook, Crow Wing, Itasca, Kanabec, Koochiching, Lake, Mille Lacs, Morrison, Pine, Saint Louis, Becker, Beltrami, Big Stone, Clay, Clearwater, Douglas, Grant, Hubbard, Kittson, Lake of the Woods, Mahnomen, Marshall, Norman, Otter Tail, Pennington, Polk, Pope, Red Lake, Roseau, Stearns, Stevens, Todd, Traverse, Wadena, and Wilkin and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Minneapolis (300 South Fourth Street, Suite 202, Minneapolis, MN 55415), St. Paul (316 North Robert Street, Suite 100, St. Paul, MN 55101), Duluth (515 West First Street, Suite 417, Duluth, MN 55802-1397), and Fergus Falls (118 South Mill Street, Suite 212, Fergus Falls, MN 56537).

Wyoming is divided into different federal districts. The Equality State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (in case citations, 10th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Wyoming, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Wyoming contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Wyoming (in case citations, D. Wyo.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Wyoming (in case citations, D. Wyo.) covers the counties of Albany, Big Horn, Campbell, Carbon, Converse, Crook, Fremont, Goshen, Hot Springs, Johnson, Laramie, Lincoln, Natrona, Niobrara, Park, Platte, Sheridan, Sublette, Sweetwater, Teton, Uinta, Washakie, and Weston, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Cheyenne (2120 Capitol Avenue, Room 2131, Cheyenne, WY 82001), Casper (111 South Wolcott, Casper, WY 82601), and Mammoth (105 Albright Avenue, Mammoth, WY 82190).

Louisiana is divided into different federal districts. The Pelican State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit (in case citations, 5th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Louisiana, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Louisiana is divided into three federal districts, the Eastern District, the Western District, and the Middle District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Louisiana covers the parishes of Assumption, Jefferson, Lafourche, Orleans, Plaquemines, St. Bernard, St. Charles, St. James, St. John the Baptist, St. Tammany, Tangipahoa, Terrebonne and Washington, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in New Orleans (500 Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130).
  2. The United States District Court for the Western District of Louisiana covers the parishes of Acadia Parish, Louisiana; Allen Parish, Louisiana; Avoyelles Parish, Louisiana; Beauregard Parish, Louisiana; Bienville Parish, Louisiana; Bossier Parish, Louisiana; Caddo Parish, Louisiana; Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana; Caldwell Parish, Louisiana; Cameron Parish, Louisiana; Catahoula Parish, Louisiana; Claiborne Parish, Louisiana; Concordia Parish, Louisiana; Jefferson Davis Parish, Louisiana; De Soto Parish, Louisiana; East Carroll Parish, Louisiana; Evangeline Parish, Louisiana, Franklin Parish, Louisiana, Grant Parish, Louisiana, Iberia Parish, Louisiana, Jackson Parish, Louisiana, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana, La Salle Parish, Louisiana, Lincoln Parish, Louisiana, Madison Parish, Louisiana, Morehouse Parish, Louisiana, Natchitoches Parish, Louisiana, Ouachita Parish, Louisiana, Rapides Parish, Louisiana, Red River Parish, Louisiana, Richland Parish, Louisiana, Sabine Parish, Louisiana, Saint Landry Parish, Louisiana, Saint Martin Parish, Louisiana, Saint Mary Parish, Louisiana, Tensas Parish, Louisiana, Union Parish, Louisiana, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana, Vernon Parish, Louisiana, Webster Parish, Louisiana, West Carroll Parish, Louisiana, and Winn Parish, Louisiana., and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Alexandria (515 Murray Street, Suite 105, Alexandria, Louisiana 71301), Lafayette (800 Lafayette Street, Suite 2100, Lafayette Louisiana 70501), Lake Charles (611 Broad Street, Suite 188, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70601), Monroe (201 Jackson Street, Suite 215, Monroe, Louisiana 71201), and Shreveport (300 Fannin Street, Suite 1167, Shreveport, Louisiana 71101).
  3. The United States District Court for the Middle District of Louisiana covers the parishes of Ascension, East Baton Rouge, East Feliciana, Iberville, Livingston, Pointe Coupee, St. Helena, West Baton Rouge, and West Feliciana, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Baton Rouge (777 Florida Street, Suite 139, Baton Rouge, LA 70801).

Alabama is divided into different federal districts. The Yellowhammer State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit (in case citations, 11th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Alabama, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Alabama is divided into three federal districts, the Northern District, the Southern District, and the Middle District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Northern District of Alabama covers the counties of Calhoun, Clay, Cleburne, Talladega, Fayette, Lamar, Marion, Walker, Winston, Cherokee, DeKalb, Etowah, Marshall, St. Clair, Cullman, Jackson, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and Morgan, Colbert, Franklin, Lauderdale, Blount, Jefferson, Shelby, Bibb, Greene, Pickens, Sumter, and Tuscaloosa and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Birmingham (1729 5th Avenue North, Birmingham, AL 35203), Huntsville (101 Holmes Avenue, Huntsville, AL 35801), Tuscaloosa (2005 University Boulevard, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401), Anniston (1129 Noble Street, Anniston, AL 36201), Decatur (400 Well Street, Decatur, AL 35601), and Florence (210 North Seminary Street, Room 202, Florence, AL 35630).
  2. The United States District Court for the Southern District of Alabama covers the counties of Baldwin, Choctaw, Clarke, Conecuh, Escambia, Mobile, Monroe, Washington, Dallas, Hale, Marengo, Perry, and Wilcox, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Mobile (155 Saint Joseph St., Mobile, AL 36602), and Selma (908 Alabama Avenue, Selma, AL 36701).
  3. The United States District Court for the Middle District of Alabama covers the counties of Chambers, Lee, Macon, Randolph, Russell, Tallapoosa, Autauga, Barbour, Bullock, Butler, Chilton, Coosa, Covington, Crenshaw, Elmore, Lowndes, Montgomery, Pike, Coffee, Dale, Geneva, Henry, and Houston, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Montgomery (1 Church Street, Montgomery, AL 36104), Opelika (701 Avenue A, Opelika, AL 36801), and Dothan (100 West Troy Street, Dothan, AL 36303).

West Virginia is divided into different federal districts. The Mountain State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit (in case citations, 4th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of West Virginia, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. West Virginia is divided into two federal districts, the Northern District, and the Southern District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the Northern District of West Virgnia (N.D. W. Va.) covers the counties of Braxton, Calhoun, Doddridge, Gilmer, Harrison, Marion, Monongalia, Pleasants, Preston, Ritchie, Taylor, Barbour, Grant, Hardy, Lewis, Pendleton, Pocahontas, Randolph, Tucker, Upshur, Webster, Berkeley, Hampshire, Jefferson, Mineral, Morgan, Brooke, Hancock, Marshall, Ohio, Tyler, and Wetzel, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Clarksburg (500 West Pike Street, Room 301, P.O. Box 2857, Clarksburg, WV 26302), Elkins (P.O. Box 1518, 300 Third Street, Elkins, WV  26241), Martinsburg (217 W. King Street, Room 102, Martinsburg, WV  25401), and Wheeling (1125 Chapline Street, P.O. Box 471, Wheeling, WV  26003).
  2. The United States District Court for the Southern District of West Virgnia (S.D. W. Va.) covers the counties of Greenbrier, Raleigh, Summers, Wyoming, Mercer, McDowell, Monroe, Boone, Clay, Fayette, Jackson, Kanawha, Lincoln, Logan, Mingo, Nicholas, Roane, Wirt, Wood, Cabell, Mason, Putnam, and Wayne, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Bluefield (601 Federal Street, Room 1000, Bluefield, WV 24701), Charleston (300 Virginia Street, East, Suite 2400, Charleston, WV 25301), Huntington (845 Fifth Avenue, Room 101, Huntington, WV 25701), and Beckley (110 North Heber Street, Room 119, Beckley, WV 25801).

Utah is divided into different federal districts. The Beehive State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (in case citations, 10th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Utah, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Utah contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Utah (in case citations, D. Utah.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

  1. The United States District Court for the District of Utah (in case citations, D. Utah.) covers the counties of Box Elder, Cache, Davis, Morgan, Rich, Weber, Beaver, Carbon, Daggett, Duchesne, Emery, Garfield, Grand, Iron, Juab, Kane, Millard, Piute, Salt Lake, San Juan, Sanpete, Sevier, Summit, Tooele, Uintah, Utah, Wasatch, Washington, and Wayne, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Salt Lake City (351 S W Temple, Salt Lake City, UT 84101).

Kansas is divided into different federal districts. The Sunflower State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (in case citations, 10th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Kansas, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Kansas contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Kansas (in case citations, D. Kan.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Kansas (in case citations, D. Kan.) covers the counties of Allen, Anderson, Atchison, Barber, Barton, Bourbon, Brown, Butler, Chase, Chautauqua, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Clark, Clay, Cloud, Coffey, Comanche, Cowley, Crawford, Decatur, Dickinson, Doniphan, Douglas, Edwards, Elk, Ellis, Ellsworth, Finney, Ford, Franklin, Geary, Gove, Graham, Grant, Gray, Greeley, Greenwood, Hamilton, Harper, Harvey, Haskell, Hodgeman, Jackson, Jefferson, Jewell, Johnson, Kearny, Kingman, Kiowa, Labette, Lane, Leavenworth, Lincoln, Linn, Logan, Lyon, Marion, Marshall, McPherson, Meade, Miami, Mitchell, Montgomery, Morris, Morton, Nemaha, Neosho, Ness, Norton, Osage, Osborne, Ottawa, Pawnee, Phillips, Pottawatomie, Pratt, Rawlins, Reno, Republic, Rice, Riley, Rooks, Rush, Russell, Saline, Scott, Sedgwick, Seward, Shawnee, Sheridan, Sherman, Smith, Stafford, Stanton, Stevens, Sumner, Thomas, Trego, Wabaunsee, Wallace, Washington, Wichita, Wilson, Woods, and Wyandotte, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Kansas City (500 State Ave, Kansas City, KS 66101), Topeka (444 S.E. Quincy, Topeka, KS 66683), and Wichita (401 N. Market, Wichita, KS 67202).

Connecticut is divided into different federal districts. The Constitution State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (in case citations, 2nd Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Connecticut contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut (in case citations, D. Conn.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Connecticut (in case citations, D. Conn.) covers the counties of Hartford, Litchfield, New London, Middlesex, New Haven, Fairfield, Tolland, and Windham and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in New Haven (141 Church Street, New Haven, CT 06510), Hartford (450 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103), and Bridgeport (915 Lafayette Boulevard, Bridgeport, CT 06604).

Washington is divided into different federal districts. The Evergreen State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (in case citations, 9th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Washington, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Washington is divided into two federal districts, the Eastern District and the Western District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Washington covers the counties of Adams, Asotin, Benton, Chelan, Columbia, Douglas, Ferry, Franklin, Garfield, Grant, Kittitas, Klickitat, Lincoln, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, Spokane, Stevens, Walla Walla, Whitman, and Yakima, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Spokane (920 West Riverside Ave, Room 840, Spokane, WA 99201), Yakima (25 South 3rd St, Room 201, Yakima, WA 98901), and Richland (825 Jadwin Avenue, Room 174, Richland, WA 99352).

The United States District Court for the Western District of Washington covers the counties of Clallam, Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, Island, Jefferson, King, Kitsap, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce, San Juan, Skagit, Skamania, Snohomish, Thurston, Wahkiakum, and Whatcom and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Seattle (700 Stewart Street, Suite 2310, Seattle, WA 98101) and Tacoma (1717 Pacific Avenue, Room 3100, Tacoma, WA 98402-3200).

Alaska is divided into different federal districts. The “Last Frontier” State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (in case citations, 9th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Alaska, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Alaska contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Alaska (in case citations, D. Alaska.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Alaska (in case citations, D. Alaska.) covers the counties of Aleutians East, Aleutians West, Anchorage, Bethel, Bristol Bay, Dillingham, Kenai Peninsula, Kodiak Island, Lake and Peninsula, Matanuska-Susitna, Valdez-Cordova, Denali, Fairbanks North Star, North Slope, Southeast Fairbanks, Yukon-Koyukuk, Haines, Hoonah-Angoon, Juneau, Petersburg, Sitka, Skagway, Yakutat, Ketchikan Gateway, Prince of Wales, Wrangell, Nome, Northwest Arctic, and Kusilvak, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Anchorage (222 W. 7th Avenue, Rm 229, Anchorage, AK 99513), Fairbanks (101 12th Avenue, Rm 332, Fairbanks, AK 99701), Juneau (709 W. 9th Street, Rm 979, Juneau, AK 99801), Ketchikan (648 Mission Street, Rm 507, Ketchikan, AK 99901), and Nome (113 Front Street, Nome, AK 99762).

Montana is divided into different federal districts. The Big Sky State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (in case citations, 9th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Montana, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Montana contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Montana (in case citations, D. Mont.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Montana (in case citations, D. Mont.) covers the counties of Beaverhead, Big Horn, Blaine, Broadwater, Carbon, Carter, Cascade, Chouteau, Custer, Daniels, Dawson, Deer Lodge, Fallon, Fergus, Flathead, Gallatin, Garfield, Glacier, Golden Valley, Granite, Hill, Jefferson, Judith Basin, Lake, Lewis And Clark, Liberty, Lincoln, Madison, McCone, Meagher, Mineral, Missoula. Musselshell, Park, Petroleum, Phillips, Pondera, Powder River, Powell, Prairie, Ravalli, Richland, Roosevelt, Rosebud, Sanders, Sheridan, Silver Bow, Stillwater, Sweet Grass, Teton, Toole, Treasure, Valley, Wheatland, Wibaux, Yellowstone, and Yellowstone National Park, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Billings (2601 2nd Avenue North, Billings, MT 59101), Butte (400 N. Main, Butte, MT 59701), Great Falls (125 Central Avenue West, Great Falls, MT 59404), Helena (901 Front Street, Helena, MT 59626, and Missoula (201 E. Broadway, Missoula, MT 59802).

Maine is divided into different federal districts. The Pine Tree State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (in case citations, 1st Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Maine, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Maine contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Maine (in case citations, D. Me.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Maine (in case citations, D. Me.) covers the counties of Androscoggin, Aroostook, Cumberland, Franklin, Hancock, Kennebec, Knox, Lincoln, Oxford, Penobscot, Piscataquis, Sagadahoc, Somerset, Waldo, Washington, and York, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Portland (156 Federal Street, Portland, ME 04101), and Bangor (202 Harlow Street, Bangor, ME 04401).

Rhode Island is divided into different federal districts. The Ocean State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (in case citations, 1st Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Rhode Island contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island (in case citations, D. RI.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island (in case citations, D. RI.) covers the counties of Bristol, Kent, Newport, Providence, and Washington and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Providence (One Exchange Terrace, Federal Building and Courthouse, Providence, RI 02903).

Vermont is divided into different federal districts. The Green Mountain State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (in case citations, 2nd Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Vermont, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Vermont contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Vermont (in case citations, D. Vt.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Vermont (in case citations, D. Vt.) covers the counties of Addison, Bennington, Caledonia, Chittenden, Essex, Franklin, Grand Isle, Lamoille, Orange, Orleans, Rutland, Washington, Windham, and Windsor and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Burlington (11 Elmwood Avenue, Room 506, Burlington, VT 05401).

New Hampshire is divided into different federal districts. The Granite Mountain State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit (in case citations, 1st Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. New Hampshire contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire (in case citations, D.N.H.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of New Hampshire (in case citations, D.N.H.) covers the counties of Belknap, Carroll, Cheshire, Coos, Grafton, Hillsborough, Merrimack, Rockingham, Strafford, Sullivan, and Windsor, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Concord (55 Pleasant Street, Room 110, Concord, NH 03301).

Iowa is divided into different federal districts. The Hawkeye State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit (in case citations, 8th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Iowa, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Iowa is divided into two federal districts, the Northern District and the Southern District. These districts locate federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the Northern District of Iowa (N.D. Iowa) covers the counties of Benton, Cedar, Grundy, Hardin, Iowa, Jones, Linn, Tama, Butler, Calhoun, Carroll, Cerro Gordo, Emmet, Franklin, Hamilton, Hancock, Humboldt, Kossuth, Palo Alto, Pocahontas, Webster, Winnebago, Worth, Wright, Allamakee, Black Hawk, Bremer, Buchanan, Chickasaw, Clayton, Delaware, Dubuque, Fayette, Floyd, Howard, Jackson, Mitchell, Winneshiek, Buena Vista, Cherokee, Clay, Crawford, Dickinson, Ida, Lyon, Monona, O’Brien, Osceola, Plymouth, Sac, Sioux, and Woodbury   and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Cedar Rapids (111 Seventh Avenue SE Box 12, Cedar Rapids, IA 52401-2101), and Sioux City (320 Sixth Street, Sioux City, IA 51101).

The United States District Court for the Southern District of Iowa (S.D. Iowa) covers the counties of Adair, Adams, Appanoose, Boone, Clarke, Dallas, Davis, Decatur, Greene, Guthrie, Jasper, Jefferson, Keokuk, Lucas, Madison, Mahaska, Marion, Marshall, Monroe, Polk, Poweshiek, Ringgold, Story, Taylor, Union, Wapello, Warren, Wayne, Clinton, Des Moines, Henry, Johnson, Lee, Louisa, Muscatine, Scott, Van Buren, Washington, Audubon, Cass, Fremont, Harrison, Mills, Montgomery, Page, Pottawattamie and Shelby and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Des Moines (123 East Walnut Street, Des Moines, IA 50309) and Davenport (131 East 4th Street, Davenport, IA 52801).

New Mexico is divided into different federal districts. The “Land of Enchantment” is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit (in case citations, 10th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of New Mexico (in case citations, D.N.M.), federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. New Mexico contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of New Mexico (in case citations, D.N.M.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of New Mexico (in case citations, D.N.M.), covers the counties of Los Alamos, McKinley, Rio Arriba, Sandoval, San Juan Santa Fe, Colfax, Harding, Mora, San Miguel, Taos, Union, Bernalillo, Catron, Cibola, Socorro, Valencia, Curry, De Baca, Guadalupe, Quay, Roosevelt, Torrance, Dona Ana, Grant, Hidalgo, Luna, Sierra, Chaves, Eddy, Lea, Lincoln and Otero, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Albuquerque (333 Lomas Blvd NW, Albuquerque, NM 87102), Las Cruces (100 N. Church Street, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88001), Santa Fe (106 S. Federal Place, Santa Fe, NM, 87501), and Roswell (500 N. Richardson, Roswell, NM  88201).

Idaho is divided into different federal districts. The Gem State is part of the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (in case citations, 9th Cir.). In the United States District Court for the District of Idaho, federal prosecutors are tasked to enforce federal law on behalf of the U.S. Department of Justice. Idaho contains one federal district, the United States District Court for the District of Idaho (in case citations, D. Idaho.). This district locates federal courthouses as well as branches of the Department of Justice, so-called U.S. Attorney’s Offices. The U.S. Attorney’s Offices employ federal prosecutors, also referred to as Assistant United States Attorneys (AUSA).

The United States District Court for the District of Idaho (in case citations, D. Idaho.) covers the counties of Boundary, Butte, Camas, Canyon, Caribou, Cassia, Clark, Clearwater, Custer, Elmore, Franklin, Fremont, Gem, Gooding, Idaho, Jefferson, Jerome, Kootenai, Latah, Lemhi, Lewis, Lincoln, Madison, Minidoka, Nez Perce, Oneida, Owyhee, Payette, Power, Shoshone, Teton, Twin Falls, Valley, Washington, and it hosts federal courthouses and U.S. Attorney’s Offices in Boise (550 W. Fort Street, Suite 400, Boise ID 83724).

Call Attorney Dr. Nick Oberheiden Today and Get a Free and Confidential Consultation!

Call Oberheiden, P.C. today at (214) 692-2171, including on weekends, or inquire online. Consultations are free and confidential.

Meet Nick

Impeccable Service

ratingratingratingratingrating

Nick Oberheiden is the absolute best federal litigation attorney. Nick gives you the immediate comfort of feeling 100% protected. He is polite, respectful— and extremely compelling. His legal strategy turned out to be brilliant.

– Marshall M.

View more testimonials

Contact Us Today

Categories

If you are under
investigation
you should contact us today

Contact the Experienced Attorneys of Oberheiden, P.C. Now for a Confidential Consultation

Contact Us Now