SEC Whistleblower Attorney

Talk to an SEC Whistleblower Lawyer About Exposing Securities Fraud

Lynette Byrd
Attorney Lynette Byrd
SEC Whistleblower Team Lead
Former DOJ Attorneyenvelope iconContact Lynette directly
Tim Allen
Tim Allen
SEC Whistleblower Team
Former Secret Service (Digital Forensics Expert)
Brian Kuester
Attorney Brian Kuester
SEC Whistleblower Team
Former U.S. Attorney and District Attorneyenvelope iconContact Brian directly

In the 2023 fiscal year, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) pursued 784 enforcement actions and recovered nearly $5 billion in financial remedies for securities fraud. This includes enforcement actions initiated by whistleblowers, who submitted more than 18,000 tips to the SEC during the year. Whistleblowers play a critical role in the federal government’s efforts to protect investors from securities fraud; and, if you are thinking about coming forward, you should speak with an SEC whistleblower attorney promptly.

We provide experienced legal representation for SEC whistleblowers. Our team of whistleblower lawyers includes former U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) prosecutors assigned to handle securities fraud and other white-collar cases. We handle cases under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX), the Dodd-Frank Act of 2010 (Dodd-Frank), and all other federal whistleblower statutes—and, in doing so, we rely on our extensive experience protecting whistleblowers and uncovering and prosecuting federal securities law violations.

5 Important Facts About Blowing the Whistle on Securities Fraud with the SEC

If you are thinking about blowing the whistle on securities fraud with the SEC, it is extremely important that you make informed decisions about your next steps. While it is important to come forward when you have information about securities fraud, it is also important to make sure you are protecting yourself. Our SEC whistleblower attorneys can help—and we can guide you step-by-step through the process of deciding what to do with the information you have in your possession.

What do you need to know in order to make informed decisions? Here are five important facts for potential SEC whistleblowers:

1. You Can Remain Anonymous if You Choose

As an SEC whistleblower, you can remain anonymous if you choose. Our lawyers can protect your identity, and we can work with the SEC on your behalf. If you disclose your identity to the SEC, it will protect your identity as well (it has a statutory obligation to do so); and, in the vast majority of circumstances, your identity will never be revealed outside of the SEC’s walls.

2. SEC Whistleblowers Are Protected Against Retaliation

Once you qualify as an SEC whistleblower, you will be protected against retaliation in your employment. Federal whistleblower laws (including SOX and Dodd-Frank) prohibit employers from retaliating against employees who assert their statutory right to report securities fraud and other violations to the government. Most likely, your employer will not learn your identity as an SEC whistleblower. But, if your employer is able to discern your identity, it will be prohibited from firing you or taking other adverse employment action.

3. SEC Whistleblowers Are Entitled to Financial Awards in Some Cases

Under the SEC’s whistleblower program, whistleblowers are entitled to financial awards in some cases. If you are interested in obtaining an SEC whistleblower award, our lawyers can assist with this as part of our representation. The SEC has paid billions of dollars to whistleblowers in recent years, including a record of nearly $600 million in the 2023 fiscal year.

4. You May Need to Act Quickly to Secure Whistleblower Status

To secure protection as an SEC whistleblower (and to qualify for an SEC whistleblower award), you must generally be the first person to come forward with the information you have in your possession. When you contact Oberheiden P.C., we will arrange for you to speak with an SEC whistleblower attorney as soon as possible. Your lawyer will explain everything you need to know about reporting securities fraud to the SEC, and then your lawyer will help you make informed decisions about your next steps.

5. We Can Help You Make Informed Decisions at No Cost

We provide legal representation for SEC whistleblowers at no out-of-pocket cost. Your lawyer will help you decide whether to come forward; and, if you decide not to come forward, you owe us nothing. If you come forward and receive a whistleblower award from the SEC, we will receive a percentage of your payment from the SEC as compensation for our services.

Put our highly experienced team on your side

Dr. Nick Oberheiden
Dr. Nick Oberheiden

Founder

Attorney-at-Law

Lynette S. Byrd
Lynette S. Byrd

Former DOJ Trial Attorney

Partner

Brian J. Kuester
Brian J. Kuester

Former U.S. Attorney

Amanda Marshall
Amanda Marshall

Former U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

Joe Brown
Joe Brown

Former U.S. Attorney

Local Counsel

John W. Sellers
John W. Sellers

Former Senior DOJ Trial Attorney

Linda Julin McNamara
Linda Julin McNamara

Federal Appeals Attorney

Aaron L. Wiley
Aaron L. Wiley

Former DOJ attorney

Local Counsel

Roger Bach
Roger Bach

Former Special Agent (DOJ)

Chris Quick
Chris J. Quick

Former Special Agent (FBI & IRS-CI)

Michael S. Koslow
Michael S. Koslow

Former Supervisory Special Agent (DOD-OIG)

Ray Yuen
Ray Yuen

Former Supervisory Special Agent (FBI)

10 Examples of Securities Fraud You Can Report As an SEC Whistleblower

When can (and should) you blow the whistle with the SEC? We represent individuals who have information about all forms of securities fraud. This includes common examples such as:

  • Bribing Public Officials – Bribing public officials in the United States or abroad in order to secure approval of securities offerings or other governmental benefits can violate multiple federal statutes.
  • Brokerage Firm and Advisory Firm Fraud – Brokerage firms and advisory firms have a legal duty to act in their customers’ best interests. When these firms (or individual brokers or advisors) charge excessive fees, churn customers’ accounts, or engage in other fraudulent practices, the SEC will take action to hold them accountable.
  • Corporate Accounting Fraud – Combating fraudulent corporate accounting practices in violation of SOX and other pertinent federal securities statutes is a long-standing SEC enforcement priority.
  • Cryptocurrency-Related Securities Fraud – Combating cryptocurrency-related securities fraud has been a top SEC enforcement priority as of late as well—including taking action to prevent fraudulent initial coin offerings (ICOs) and other prohibited cryptocurrency-related securities offerings.
  • Financial Reporting Violations – Publicly traded companies have various financial reporting obligations under SOX. When they fail to meet their reporting obligations (or intentionally or negligently report false financial information), this can leave investors unable to make informed trading decisions.
  • Front Running – Front running involves trading on information that has not yet been made public. Corporate insiders, brokers, and various other individuals can (and should) be held accountable for taking advantage of their position to the detriment of retail investors.
  • Insider Trading – Federal securities laws and SEC regulations prohibit corporate “insiders” from trading in a company’s securities based on material non-public information (MNPI). “Insiders” can include not only corporate executives and board members, but also family members, accountants, attorneys, and other individuals.
  • Manipulating the Securities Market – Market manipulation, including fraudulent marketing campaigns and pump-and-dump schemes, can cause substantial harm to innocent investors—and it is strictly prohibited under federal securities laws.
  • Ponzi Schemes and Pyramid Schemes – Ponzi schemes and pyramid schemes have made a comeback in recent years. These schemes are patently unlawful, and they can leave unsuspecting investors facing substantial losses.
  • Unregistered Securities Offerings and Brokerage Services – The federal registration requirements for securities offerings and brokerage services are also intended to protect investors. When entities and individuals make unregistered securities offerings or offer unregistered brokerage services, this is often just one of a laundry list of statutory and regulatory violations.

Again, these are just examples. Securities fraud can take many additional forms; and, if you believe that you may have information about any form of securities fraud at a publicly traded company, private corporation, brokerage firm, advisory firm, or other entity, we strongly encourage you to speak with an SEC whistleblower attorney at Oberheiden P.C. as soon as possible.

FAQs: Working with an SEC Whistleblower Attorney at Oberheiden P.C.

How do I file a whistleblower complaint with the SEC?

Filing a whistleblower complaint with the SEC involves contacting the commission’s Office of the Whistleblower. However, securing whistleblower protection is not simply a matter of submitting a tip to the SEC. There are additional steps involved; and, to ensure that you do everything necessary to secure protection, it is strongly recommended that you work with an experienced SEC whistleblower lawyer.

What is the SEC Office of the Whistleblower?

The SEC Office of the Whistleblower is responsible for administering the Commission’s whistleblower program. It receives and investigates whistleblower complaints alleging violations of all federal securities laws, including SOX, Dodd-Frank, and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. If you need to blow the whistle on securities fraud, this will most likely involve submitting a formal complaint to the SEC Office of the Whistleblower.

Can I remain anonymous as an SEC whistleblower?

Yes, you have the option to remain anonymous as an SEC whistleblower. If you choose not to disclose your name to the SEC, your lawyer can manage all communications on your behalf; and, if you become eligible for an SEC whistleblower award, your lawyer can collect your award and distribute it to you through escrow.

What information do I need to qualify as an SEC whistleblower?

You do not need any specific information to qualify as an SEC whistleblower. The key is that you must have sufficient information to form an objectively reasonable belief that securities fraud either: (i) has been committed; or, (ii) may be committed in the future. An SEC whistleblower lawyer at Oberheiden P.C. can determine if you qualify.

How can an SEC whistleblower lawyer help me?

Along with determining if you qualify for whistleblower protection, there are several additional ways an experienced SEC whistleblower lawyer can help you. At Oberheiden P.C., we guide our clients through every stage of the process—from deciding whether to come forward to submitting their complaint to the SEC Office of the Whistleblower, and from assisting with the SEC’s investigation to enforcing our clients’ statutory rights.


Contact Us to Speak with a Senior SEC Whistleblower Attorney in Confidence

If you would like to know more about blowing the whistle with the SEC, we invite you to get in touch. To speak with a senior SEC whistleblower attorney at Oberheiden P.C. in confidence, please call 888-680-1745 or contact us confidentially online today.

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